ALL PARTS
PART I
Scott Olsen — "I Didn't Realize How Bad It Was."

PART I - Scott Olsen“I DIDN'T REALIZE HOW BAD IT WAS.”

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Shot in the head by police firing bean-bag rounds at demonstrators, this veteran awoke from a coma, returned to protesting, and became a symbol to the Occupy movement. Ten years later, he represents a life shattered by the misuse of less-lethal munitions.

READ PART I
PART II
Andre Miller — What Is a Rubber Bullet?

PART II - Andre MillerWhat is a rubber bullet?

Andre Miller, who was shot in the head with a tear-gas canister in July 2020, is photographed at his home in Portland, Ore., in June 2022.

Less-lethal munitions come in all shapes and sizes and can leave behind devastating wounds. Victims of KIPs often don’t know what hit them, unless — like this Black Lives Matter protester — there’s shrapnel left behind.

READ PART II
PART III
Richard Moore — The Original Rubber Bullet

PART III - Richard MooreThe original rubber bullet

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This 10-year-old from Derry, Northern Ireland was shot in the face with a rubber bullet while running home from school, an attack that blinded him for life. In the decades since, the U.K. has turned away from less-lethal munitions while U.S. law enforcement has increasingly embraced them. Why?

READ PART III
PART IV
Victoria Snelgrove — When Things Go Wrong

PART IV - Victoria SnelgroveWhen Things Go Wrong

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Everyone knew if the Red Sox ever beat the Yankees, Boston would burst. But what actually happened when they finally won exceeded people's worst fears. How a euphoric riot, a lack of police training, and an untested less-lethal weapon left a woman dead and city leaders searching for answers.

READ PART IV
PART V
Minneapolis
PART VI
Austin
TIMELINE
A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE
 

A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE

To understand how police use less-lethal munitions, it’s necessary to examine when they weren’t fired at all. This timeline outlines events from before rubber bullets were invented through the 50 years that followed. But because U.S. law enforcement isn’t bound by law to track kinetic impact projectile-related injuries or deaths, this timeline — and the full story of KIPs — will always be incomplete.

Photo Editing and Archival Research by

Amelia Lang

WRITTEN BY

Eoin O'Carroll

WARNING

This website contains graphic images of violence that some people may find disturbing.